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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Google says it will no longer allow some autocomplete suggestions related to political candidates and the election, such as search predictions that could be viewed as making claims about the "the integrity or legitimacy of electoral processes."

Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The company said its new policy would eliminate search predictions that could be seen as favoring a political candidate or as making claims about "the integrity or legitimacy of electoral processes."

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump's lawyer sought to downplay his meeting and contacts with a Ukrainian member of parliament who has been described by the U.S. as attempting to interfere in the 2020 election.

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

"You don't get to shoot somebody 21 times," Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said of the deadly encounter in April. "I cannot defend that."

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Gabriel Aponte/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

Mauricio Claver-Carone is the first U.S. citizen to be nominated to lead the region's premier development funder, which provides $12 billion a year for projects in Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

Consumer prices rose 0.4% in August and 1.3% over the last 12 months. Some economists say that official measure understates inflation, because the pandemic has changed both what and how we buy.

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Bradley W. Parks/Oregon Public Broadcasting

Fires have forced residents from their homes across the state. Photographers Bradley W. Parks and Jonathan Levinson have been covering the wildfires for NPR member station Oregon Public Broadcasting.

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Richard Wainwright/AP

In May, mining giant Rio Tinto blasted through two ancient rock shelters in Western Australia in order to mine iron ore. The company has been under rising pressure to hold executives accountable.

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Claire Harbage/NPR

After losing trust in official information, the Japanese public took it upon themselves to learn to measure for radioactive matter. Nearly a decade after the nuclear disaster, they're still testing.

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